Friday, April 13, 2007

Will crime be a wedge issue in Toronto?

If the Government falls over tough-on-crime legislation, the opposition may very well find that they've lost Toronto's support.

First-hand account here by Jeff.

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Note: Comment moderation has been enabled for the weekend because I am taking a few days off. Please feel free to continue to leave comments, and I'll check them when I can.

17 comments:

Sandy You-Know-Who said...

I think you may by right. The only issue not favourable to the Conservatives federally might be the extension of the long gun registry. People (particularly in Toronto) still think it makes a difference. Yet, in most, if not all, gun crimes in Toronto, they were stolen. A registry would not have done any good. But, hard to convince people of that.

By the way, even if you peek once in awhile, don't publish too often or we'll know.LOL

jeff davidson said...

what utter bunk. stephen harper is as welcome in toronto as stephane dion is in calgary.

Anonymous said...

Crime....breaking news.

York Police break up counterfeit ring.

http://tinyurl.com/2u2w5d

Just heard it on Adler online.

raz

A BCer in Toronto said...

I don't doubt they'll try to make it a wedge issue. Whether it will work or not is another story. I'm not sure enough has happened recently crime-wise to swing enough votes to make a difference. And Scarborough is bedrock Liberal.

Let me just say this though, having had a closer than comfortable proximity to GTA homicide #17. While crime stats are decreasing, I do now understand the fear of crime that is still rising. I feel that fear.

However, that doesn't mean I'm now going to support knee-jerk "tough on crime" policies. I support effective policies on crime, and I think that needs to include the full spectrum, from prevention programs to tough sentences. I will continue to be opposed to so-called "tough on crime" measures that, while making people feel better, have been proven elsewhere to be utterly ineffective in reducing crime.

There's no easy answers, and I don't claim to have them either. If I could distill it though, I'd say leave political wedges out of it to be smart on crime.

Anonymous said...

What is warped in Toronto is that everyone is getting more afraid of crime yet the aholes keep running to vote liberal thinking that more immigration will save them??
http://realconservative.wordpress.com

Anonymous said...

What is warped in Toronto is that everyone is getting more afraid of crime yet the aholes keep running to vote liberal thinking that more immigration will save them??

I forgot that immigration = crime.

Thanks...

Anonymous said...

Read about the murder in your building Jeff.

Just a quick question. If the god guys catch the killer and s/he turns out to be on parole with a history of violent crimes, will you agree the Conservatives are on the right track with the 3 strikes proposal?

Not trying to be demeaning, but most people who have never had that type of crime committed that close to home know how it feels. I also experienced the same thing on my street last year.

A BCer in Toronto said...

...will you agree the Conservatives are on the right track with the 3 strikes proposal

Let me say this: I favour strong, real sentences for habitual dangerous offenders.

A "three-strikes your out" law though? I don't think so. Certainly not as it was applied in California, for example, with some truly ridiculous situations arising. I don't think any good policy can be derived from sports rules.

The whole three-strikes thing has always struck me as more political marketing than crime fighting, and it still does. It markets well, that's it, but it's not particularly effective.

Red Tory said...

Who knows what nefarious funny business people could get up to in your absence...

Anonymous said...

" A "three-strikes your out" law though? I don't think so. Certainly not as it was applied in California, for example, with some truly ridiculous situations arising. I don't think any good policy can be derived from sports rules."

I certainly agree with you on that. But the 3 strike law legislation put forth by the Consevatives only applies to something like 12 crimes, all the most violent. Murder, assault with a weapon, sexual assault aginst a minor, etc. In my opinion if someone gets convicted of a serious violent offence twice and does it again, its time to go away for good.

John said...

I would rather see the law changed so that a criminal is only released if his or her probability to re-offend is low. As it stands today criminals are let out on the street when their time is done regardless of how likely it is that they will commit another crime.

Anonymous said...

off topic Joanne

I don't know if there is agreement with me but... although I sympathize with the income trust people their trying to highjack the country will get redundant and they will lose a lot of sympathy
I feel disruptive tactics rarely work given time

Florence

Anonymous said...

tried to post

Sandy said...

Joanne -- You did it. I can hear the hallelujah chorus! You actually took the whole weekend off, although I did see a comment somewhere. LOL Good on you. If an election is called, you'll be glad you rested up.

Ryan R said...

I do think that we should have mandatory minimum sentences for the worst crimes out there (murder, rape, etc...), and that repeat violent offenders should face progressively higher sentences for each new violent crime that they commit.

I have some reservations over a "three strikes" law, though I'm inclined to err on being a bit too harsh than on being a bit too soft (only because judges, from what I've read and seen, tend to err in the other direction).

The gun registry is a major waste of money, and time. I honestly don't see the rationale for it at all.

Anonymous said...

Summer's coming - it's time for the Toronto Star to start race baiting the black community again(they always pick on the black community - connecting blacks and violence is an easy sell for the Star). So even if crime doesn't increase, we're bound to hear a lot about it.

Joanne (True Blue) said...

Well, I just got back from spending the weekend in Toronto, and walking around downtown. Interesting how you can feel so safe in your hotel, but walk outside and a block in another direction you're in a seedy area with very strange people staring at you or asking for money, etc.

Toronto is an interesting combination of new & old all interspersed. Crime can certainly happen anywhere but I suppose the probability increases with density and high population.